Policies & Procedures

Achieving Positive Behaviour Policy

Little Roo’s believes that children flourish best when their personal, social and emotional needs are met and where there are clear and developmentally appropriate expectations for their behaviour.

Children need to learn to consider the views and feelings, needs and rights, of others and the impact that their behaviour has on people, places and objects.

This is a developmental task that requires support, encouragement, teaching and setting the correct example. The principles that underpin how we achieve positive and considerate behaviour exist within the programme for promoting personal, social and emotional development.

Procedures

We have a named person who has overall responsibility for our programme for supporting personal, social and emotional development, including issues concerning behaviour.

We require the named person to:

  • keep her/himself up to date with legislation, research and thinking on promoting positive behaviour and on handling children’s behaviour where it may require additional support;
  • access relevant sources of expertise on promoting positive behaviour within the programme for supporting personal, social and emotional development; and
  • check that all staff have relevant in-service training on promoting positive behaviour. We keep a record of staff attendance at this training.We require all staff, volunteers and students to provide a positive model of behaviour by treating children, parents and one another with friendliness, care and courtesy.We expect all members of our setting – children, parents, staff, volunteers and students – to keep to the guidelines, requiring these to be applied constantly.Strategies with children who engage in inconsiderate behaviourWe ensure that there are enough popular toys and resources and sufficient activities available so that children are meaningfully occupied without the need for unnecessary conflict over sharing and waiting for turns.We support each child in developing self-esteem, confidence and feelings of competence.We avoid creating situations in which children receive adult attention only in return for inconsiderate behaviour.We never send children out of the room by themselves, nor do we use a ‘naughty chair’ or a ‘time out’ strategy that excludes children from the group.We do not use techniques intended to single out and humiliate individual children.Details of such an event (what happened, what action was taken and by whom, and the names of witnesses) are brought to the attention of our setting leader and are recorded in the child’s personal file. The child’s parent(s) is informed on the same day.We do not shout or raise our voices in a threatening way to respond to children’s inconsiderate behaviour.When children under three years old behave in inconsiderate ways we recognise that strategies for supporting them will need to be developmentally appropriate and differ from those for older children.Common inconsiderate or hurtful behaviours of young children include tantrums, biting or fighting. Staff are calm and patient, offering comfort to intense emotions, helping children to manage their feelings and talk about them to help resolve issues and promote understanding.We focus on ensuring a child’s attachment figure in the setting, their key person, is building a strong relationship to provide security to the child.
    Distraction is often used if staff observe a child may be about to engage in unwanted behaviour.Information on promoting positive behaviour with younger children and dealing with biting is available for parent/carers.Young children often engage in play that has aggressive themes – such as superhero and weapon play; some children appear pre-occupied with these themes, but their behaviour is not necessarily a precursor to hurtful behaviour or bullying, although it may be inconsiderate at times and may need addressing using strategies as above.We will develop strategies to contain play that are agreed with the children, and understood by them, with acceptable behavioural boundaries to ensure children are not hurt.We are able to tune in to the content of the play, perhaps to suggest alternative strategies for heroes and heroines, making the most of ‘teachable moments’ to encourage empathy and lateral thinking to explore alternative scenarios and strategies for conflict resolution.We take hurtful behaviour very seriously. Most children under the age of five will at some stage hurt or say something hurtful to another child, especially if their emotions are high at the time, but it is not helpful to label this behaviour as ‘bullying’. For children under five, hurtful behaviour is momentary, spontaneous and often without cognisance of the feelings of the person whom they have hurt.We will help them manage these feelings as they have neither the biological means nor the cognitive means to do this for themselves.Therefore we help this process by offering support, calming the child who is angry as well as the one who has been hurt by the behaviour. By helping the child to return to a normal state, we are helping the brain to develop the physiological response system that will help the child be able to manage his or her own feelings.Our way of responding to pre-verbal children is to calm them through holding and cuddling. Verbal children will also respond to cuddling to calm them down, but we offer them an explanation and discuss the incident with them to their level of understanding.We help young children learn to empathise with others, understanding that they have feelings too and that their actions impact on others’ feelings. “When you hit Adam, it hurt him and he didn’t like that and it made him cry”.
    We help young children develop pro-social behaviour, such as resolving conflict over who has the toy. “I can see you are feeling better now and Adam isn’t crying any more. Let’s see if we can be friends and find another car, so you can both play with one”.We support social skills through modelling behaviour, through activities, drama and stories. We build self-esteem and confidence in children, recognising their emotional needs through close and committed relationships with them.When hurtful behaviour becomes problematic, we work with parents to identify the cause and find a solution together. The main reasons for very young children to engage in excessive hurtful behaviour are that:
  • We help a child to understand the effect that their hurtful behaviour has had on another child; we do not force children to say sorry, but encourage this where it is clear that they are genuinely sorry and wish to show this to the person they have hurt.
  • We are aware that the same problem may happen over and over before skills such as sharing and turn-taking develop. In order for both the biological maturation and cognitive development to take place, children will need repeated experiences with problem solving, supported by patient adults and clear boundaries.
  • We recognise that young children require help in understanding the range of feelings they experience. We help children recognise their feelings by naming them and helping children to express them, making a connection verbally between the event and the feeling. “Adam took your car, didn’t he, and you were enjoying playing with it. You didn’t like it when he took it, did you? Did it make you feel angry? Is that why you hit him?” Older children will be able to verbalise their feelings better, talking through themselves the feelings that motivated the behaviour.
  • We do not engage in punitive responses to a young child’s rage as that will have the opposite effect.
  • We understand that self-management of intense emotions, especially of anger, happens when the brain has developed neurological systems to manage the physiological processes that take place when triggers activate responses of anger or fear.
  • We recognise that young children behave in hurtful ways towards others because they have not yet developed the means to manage intense feelings that sometimes overwhelm them.
  • Hurtful behaviour
  • We recognise that fantasy play also contains many violently dramatic strategies, e.g. blowing up and shooting, and that themes often refer to ‘goodies and baddies’ and as such offer opportunities for us to explore concepts of right and wrong.
  • We recognise that teasing and rough and tumble play are normal for young children and acceptable within limits. We regard these kinds of play as pro-social and not as problematic or aggressive.
  • Rough and tumble play and fantasy aggression
  • We do not expect children under 3 to say sorry as they often do not have an understanding of what this means.
  • If tantrums, biting or fighting are frequent, we try to find out the underlying cause – such as a change or upheaval at home or frequent change of carers. Sometimes a child has not settled in well and the behaviour may be the result of ‘separation anxiety’.
  • We recognise that babies and very young children are unable to regulate their own emotions, such as fear, anger or distress, and require sensitive adults to help them do this.
  • Children under three years
  • In cases of serious misbehaviour, such as racial or other abuse, we make clear immediately the unacceptability of the behaviour and attitudes, by means of explanations rather than personal blame.
  • We use physical restraint, such as holding, only to prevent physical injury to children or adults and/or serious damage to property.
  • We never use physical or corporal punishment, such as smacking or shaking. Children are never threatened with these.
  • When children behave in inconsiderate ways, we help them to understand the outcomes of their actions and support them in learning how to cope more appropriately.
  • We support each child in developing a sense of belonging in our group, so that they feel valued and welcome.
  • We acknowledge considerate behaviour such as kindness and willingness to share.
  • We require all staff, volunteers and students to use positive strategies for handling any inconsiderate behaviour, by helping children find solutions in ways which are appropriate for the children’s ages and stages of development.Such solutions might include, for example, acknowledgement of feelings, explanation as to what was not acceptable and supporting children to gain control of their feelings so that they can learn a more appropriate response.
  • We work in partnership with children’s parents. Parents are regularly informed about their children’s behaviour by their key person. We work with parents to address recurring inconsiderate behaviour, using our observation records to help us to understand the cause and to decide jointly how to respond appropriately.
  • We familiarise new staff and volunteers with the setting’s Achieving Positive Behaviour policy and its guidelines for behaviour.
  • We recognise that codes for interacting with other people vary between cultures and require staff to be aware of – and respect – those used by members of the setting.
  • they do not feel securely attached to someone who can interpret and meet their needs – this may be in the home and it may also be in the setting;
  • their parent, or carer in the setting, does not have skills in responding appropriately, and consequently negative patterns are developing where hurtful behaviour is the only response the child has to express feelings of anger;
  • the child may have insufficient language, or mastery of English, to express him or herself and may feel frustrated;
  • the child is exposed to levels of aggressive behaviour at home and may be at risk emotionally, or may be experiencing child abuse;
  • the child has a developmental condition that affects how they behave.BullyingA child who is bullying has reached a stage of cognitive development where he or she is able to plan to carry out a premeditated intent to cause distress to another. Bullying can occur in children five years old and over and may well be an issue in after school clubs and holiday schemes catering for slightly older children.
  • If a child bullies another child or children we take the following steps:
    We show the children who have been bullied that we are able to listen to their concerns and act upon them.
  • We take bullying very seriously. Bullying involves the persistent physical or verbal abuse of another child or children. It is characterised by intent to hurt, often planned, and accompanied by an awareness of the impact of the bullying behaviour.
  • Where this does not work, we use the Code of Practice to support the child and family, making the appropriate referrals to a Behaviour Support Team where necessary.
  • We intervene to stop the child who is bullying from harming the other child or children.
  • We explain to the child doing the bullying why her/his behaviour is not acceptable.
  • We give reassurance to the child or children who have been bullied.
  • We help the child who has done the bullying to recognise the impact of their actions.
  • We make sure that children who bully receive positive feedback for considerate behaviour and are given opportunities to practise and reflect on considerate behaviour.
  • We do not label children who bully as ‘bullies’.
  • We recognise that children who bully may be experiencing bullying themselves, or be subject to abuse or other circumstance causing them to express their anger in negative ways towards others.
  • We recognise that children who bully are often unable to empathise with others and for this reason we do not insist that they say sorry unless it is clear that they feel genuine remorse for what they have done. Empty apologies are just as hurtful to the bullied child as the original behaviour.
  • We discuss what has happened with the parents of the child who did the bullying and work out with them a plan for handling the child’s behaviour.
  • We share what has happened with the parents of the child who has been bullied, explaining that the child who did the bullying is being helped to adopt more acceptable ways of behaving. While it is not our policy to care for sick children, who should be at home until they are well enough to return to the setting, we will agree to administer medication as part of maintaining their health and well-being or when they are recovering from an illness. We ensure that where medicines are necessary to maintain health of the child, they are given correctly and in accordance with legal requirements.The Manager, Deputy or senior staff are responsible for the correct administration of medication to children who attend the setting. This includes ensuring that parent consent forms have been completed, that medicines are stored correctly and that records are kept according to procedures.Children taking prescribed medication must be well enough to attend the setting.Non-prescription medication, such as pain or fever relief (e.g. Calpol) and teething gel, may be administered, but only with prior written consent of the parent and only when there is a health reason to do so, such as a high temperature. Children under the age of 16 years are never given medicines containing aspirin unless prescribed specifically for that child by a doctor.
    The administering of un-prescribed medication is recorded in the same way as any other medication. NB We may administer children’s paracetamol (un-prescribed) for children under the age of one year with the verbal consent of the parents in the case of a high temperature. This is to prevent febrile convulsion and where a parent or named person is on their way to collect the child.Parents must give prior written permission for the administration of medication. The staff member receiving the medication will ask the parent to sign a consent form stating the following information. No medication may be given without these details being provided:
  • Children’s prescribed medicines are stored in their original containers, are clearly labelled and are inaccessible to the children. On receiving the medication, the member of staff checks that it is in date and prescribed specifically for the current condition.
  • We only usually administer medication when it has been prescribed for a child by a doctor (or other medically qualified person). It must be in-date and prescribed for the current condition.
  • Procedures
  • In many cases, it is possible for children’s GPs to prescribe medicine that can be taken at home in the morning and evening. As far as possible, administering medicines will only be done where it would be detrimental to the child’s health if not given in the setting. If a child has not had a medication before, especially a baby/child under two, it is advised that the parent keeps the child at home for the first 48 hours to ensure there are no adverse effects, as well as to give time for the medication to take effect.
  • Administering Medicines Policy
  • the full name of child and date of birth;
  • the name of medication and strength;
  • the dosage and times to be given in the setting;
  • the method of administration;
  • how the medication should be stored and its expiry date;
  • any possible side effects that may be expected; and
  • the signature of the parent, their printed name and the date.
  • The administration of medicine is recorded accurately on our medication record sheet each time it is given and is signed by the person administering the medication and a witness. Parents are shown the record at the end of the day and asked to sign the record sheet to acknowledge the administration of the medicine. The medication record sheet records the:
  • name of the child;
  • name and strength of the medication;
  • date and time of the dose;
  • dose given and method;
  • signature of the person administering the medication and a witness and
  • parent’s signature.If the administration of prescribed medication requires medical knowledge, we obtain individual training by a health professional.We monitor the medication record sheet is monitored to look at the frequency of medication given in the setting. For example, a high incidence of antibiotics being prescribed for a number of children at similar times may indicate a need for better infection control.All medication is stored safely in a locked cupboard or refrigerated as required. Where the cupboard or refrigerator is not used solely for storing medicines, they are kept in a marked plastic bag and stored in the locked cupboard/box
    The child’s key person is responsible for ensuring medicine is handed back at the end of the day to the parent.Children who have long term medical conditions and who may require ongoing medicationParents will also contribute to a risk assessment. They should be shown around the setting, understand the routines and activities and point out anything which they think may be a risk factor for their child.The risk assessment includes vigorous activities and any other activity that may give cause for concern regarding an individual child’s health needs.
    The risk assessment includes arrangements for taking medicines on outings and advice is sought from the child’s GP if necessary where there are concerns.
    An individual health plan for the child is drawn up with the parent; outlining the key person’s role and what information must be shared with other adults who care for the child.We review the individual health plan every six months, or more frequently if necessary. This includes reviewing the medication, e.g. changes to the medication or the dosage, any side effects noted etc.Managing medicines on trips and outingsMedication for a child is taken in a sealed plastic box clearly labelled with the child’s name and the name of the medication. Inside the box is a copy of the consent form and a card to record when it has been given, including all the details that need to be recorded in the medication record as stated above.If a child on medication has to be taken to hospital, the child’s medication is taken in a sealed plastic box clearly labelled with the child’s name and the name of the medication. Inside the box is a copy of the consent form signed by the parent.Legal frameworkHealth and Safety Policy
  • We believe that the health and safety of children is of paramount importance. We make our setting a safe and healthy place for children, parents, staff and volunteers.
  • The Human Medicines Regulations (2012)
  • This procedure should be read alongside the outings procedure.
  • On returning to the setting the card is stapled to the medicine record book and the parent signs it.
  • If children are going on outings, the key person for the child will accompany the children with a risk assessment, or another member of staff who is fully informed about the child’s needs and/or medication.
  • Parents receive a copy of the individual health plan and each contributor, including the parent, signs it.
  • The individual health plan should include the measures to be taken in an emergency.
  • For some medical conditions, key staff will need to have training in a basic understanding of the condition, as well as how the medication is to be administered correctly. The training needs for staff to form part of the risk assessment.
  • We carry out a risk assessment for each child with a long term medical condition that requires on-going medication. This is the responsibility of our manager alongside the key person. Other medical or social care personnel may need to be involved in the risk assessment.
  • For some conditions, medication may be kept in the setting to be administered on a regular or as-and-when- required basis. The health and safety person will check that any medication held in the setting, is in date and return any out-of-date medication back to the parent.
  • Storage of Medicines
  • No child may self-administer. Where children are capable of understanding when they need medication, for example with asthma, they should be encouraged to tell their key person what they need. However, this does not replace staff vigilance in knowing and responding when a child requires medication.
  • We use the Pre-school Learning Alliance Medication Administration Record book for recording the administration of medicine and comply with the detailed procedures set out in that publication.
  • We aim to make children, parents, [staff] and volunteers aware of health and safety issues and to minimise the hazards and risks to enable the children to thrive in a healthy and safe environment.
  • Our member of staff responsible for health and safety is: Nicola Rayner. Is responsible for health and safety in the setting.
  • I competent to carry out these responsibilities.
  • I have undertaken health and safety training and regularly [updates his/her/update my] knowledge and understanding.The OfficeWe have public liability insurance and employers’ liability insurance. The certificate for public liability insurance is displayed in:ProceduresWe keep records of these induction training sessions and new staff and volunteers are asked to sign the records to confirm that they have taken part.
    We explain health and safety issues to the parents of new children, so that they understand the part played by these issues in the daily life of the setting.We operate a no-smoking policy.We make children aware of health and safety issues through discussions, planned activities and routines.
  • Doors
  • We operate a no mobile phone on collection procedure.
  • As necessary, health and safety training is included in the annual training plans of staff, and health and safety is discussed regularly at our staff meeting.
  • Our induction training for staff and volunteers includes a clear explanation of health and safety issues, so that all adults are able to adhere to our policy and procedures as they understand their shared responsibility for health and safety. The induction training covers matters of employee well-being, including safe lifting and the storage of potentially dangerous substances.
  • The notice board
  • Insurance Cover
  • We display the necessary health and safety poster in:
  • We take precautions to prevent children’s fingers from being trapped in doors.
  • Floors and Walkways
  • All our floor surfaces are checked daily to ensure they are clean and not uneven, wet or damaged. Any wet spills are mopped up immediately.
  • Walkways and stairs are left clear and uncluttered.
  • Electrical
  • We ensure that all electrical equipment conforms to safety requirements and is checked regularly.
  • Our boiler/electrical switch gear/meter cupboard is not accessible to the children.
  • Fires, heaters, electric sockets, wires and leads are properly guarded and we teach the children not to touch them.
  • We check storage heaters daily to make sure they are not covered.
  • There are sufficient sockets in our setting to prevent overloading.
  • We switch electrical devices off from the plug after use.
  • We ensure that the temperature of hot water is controlled to prevent scalds.
  • Lighting and ventilation is adequate in all areas of our setting, including storage areas.
  • Storage
  • All our resources and materials, which are used by the children, are stored safely.
  • All our equipment and resources are stored or stacked safely to prevent them accidentally falling or collapsing.
  • Outdoor Area
  • Our outdoor area is securely fenced. All gates and fences are childproof and safe.
  • Our outdoor area is checked for safety and cleared of rubbish, animal droppings and any other unsafe items before it is used.
  • Adults and children are alerted to the dangers of poisonous plants, herbicides and pesticides.
  • We leave receptacles upturned to prevent collection of rainwater. Where water can form a pool on equipment, it is emptied and cleaned before children start playing outside.
  • Our outdoor sand pit is covered when not in use and is cleaned regularly.
  • We check that children are suitably attired for the weather conditions and type of outdoor activities; ensuring that sun cream has been applied and hats are worn during the summer months.
  • We supervise outdoor activities at all times; and particular children on climbing equipment.
  • Hygiene
  • We seek information from the Public Health England to ensure that we keep up-to-date with the latest recommendations.
  • Our daily routines encourage the children to learn about personal hygiene.
  • We have a daily cleaner for the setting, which is over seen by the church. Children do not have unsupervised access to the kitchen.
  • We have a schedule for cleaning resources and equipment, dressing-up clothes and furnishings.
  • The toilet area has a high standard of hygiene, including hand washing and drying facilities and disposal facilities for nappies.
  • We implement good hygiene practices by:
  • cleaning tables between activities;
  • cleaning and checking toilets regularly;
  • wearing protective clothing – such as aprons and disposable gloves  when appropriate;
  • providing sets of clean clothes;
  • providing tissues and wipes.
  • Activities, Resources and Repairs
  • Before purchase or loan, we check equipment and resources to ensure that they are safe for the ages and stages of the children currently attending the setting.
  • We keep a full inventory of all items in the setting for audit and insurance purposes.
  • The layout of our play equipment allows adults and children to move safely and freely between activities.
  • All our equipment is regularly checked for cleanliness and safety, and any dangerous items are repaired or discarded.
  • We make safe and separate from general use any areas that are unsafe because of repair is needed.
  • All our materials, including paint and glue, are non-toxic.
  • We ensure that sand is clean and suitable for children’s play.
  • Physical play is constantly supervised.
  • We teach children to handle and store tools safely.
  • We check children who are sleeping regularly.
  • Children learn about health, safety and personal hygiene through the activities we provide and the routines we follow.
  • Any faulty equipment is removed from use and is repaired. If it cannot be repaired it is discarded. Large pieces of equipment are discarded only with the consent of the manager and the management team.Jewellery and Accessories We prefer children not to wear jewellery but where that is not possible (Stud earrings). We ask parents to ensure that any jewellery worn by children poses no danger; particularly earrings which may get pulled, bracelets which can get caught when climbing or necklaces that may pose a risk of strangulation.Safety of adultsWe provide safe equipment for adults to use when they need to reach up to store equipment or to change light bulbs.We record the sickness of staff and their involvement in accidents. The records are reviewed termly to identify any issues that need to be addressed.Our staff implement the current guidelines of the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH).We carry out a risk assessment for all chemicals used in the setting. This states what the risks are and what to do if they have contact with eyes or skin or are ingested.We keep the chemicals used in the setting to the minimum in order to ensure health and hygiene is maintained.
  • We do not use:
  • We keep all cleaning chemicals in their original containers.
  • We keep a record of all substances that may be hazardous to health – such as cleaning chemicals, or gardening chemicals if used and where they are stored.
    Hazardous substances are stored safely away from the children.
  • Control of substances hazardous to health
  • We ensure that all warning signs are clear and in appropriate languages.
  • We ensure that adults are provided with guidance about the safe storage, movement, lifting and erection of large pieces of equipment.
  • We ensure that hair accessories are removed before children sleep or rest.
  • Our staff do not wear jewellery or fashion accessories, such as belts or high heels that may pose a danger to themselves or children.
  • bleach;
  • anti-bacterial soap/hand wash, unless specifically advised during an infection outbreak such as Epidemic flu; or
  • anti-bacterial cleaning agents, except in the toilets, nappy changing area and food preparation areas. Anti-bacterial spays are not used when children are nearby.All members of staff are vigilant and use chemicals safely.Legal framework
  • Members of staff wear protective gloves when using cleaning chemicals.
  • Environmental factors are taken into account when purchasing, using and disposing of chemicals.
  • Health and Safety at Work Act (1974)
  • Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999)
  • Electricity at Work Regulations (1989)
  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) (2002)
  • Manual Handling Operations Regulations (1992 (As Amended 2004))
  • Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations (1992)     Preventing Radicalisation PolicyThis ‘Preventing Radicalisation Policy’ is part of Little Roo’s commitment to keeping children safe. Over the last few years, global events have led to a degree of instability in some communities and there has been a growth of extremist viewpoints, including advocacy of violent extremism.EthosStatutory Duties
  • The duty to prevent children and young people being radicalised is set out in the following documents.
  • Children who attend our Setting have the right to be safe. The Pre-School will challenge derogatory language and behaviour toward others.
  • Safeguarding children from all risks of harm is an important part of the Pre-School’s work and protecting them from extremism is one aspect of that.
  • Background
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children (2015)
  • Keeping Children Safe in Education (2015)
  • Counter Terrorism and Security Act (2015)
  • Prevent Duty Guidance (2015)
  • Related Policies
  • Behaviour Policy
  • Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy
  • Equality Policy
  • Staff Code of Conduct
  • Whistle-blowing PolicyExtremism is defined in the 2011 Prevent strategy as vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country of overseas.British Values are democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.Role of the Manager
  • It is the role of the Manager is to:
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Radicalisation refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and extremist ideologies with terrorist groups.
  • Definitions
  • ensure that the Pre-School and its staff respond to preventing radicalisation on a day-to-day basis,
  • ensure that staff conduct is consistent with preventing radicalisationIt is the role of the designated safeguarding Officer is to:
  • Role of Designated Safeguarding Officer
  • ensure that staff understand the issues of radicalisation, are able to recognise the signs of vulnerability or radicalisation and know how to refer their concerns.
  • receive safeguarding concerns about children and young people who may be vulnerable to the risk of radicalisation or are showing signs of radicalisation.
  • make referrals to appropriate agencies with regard to concerns about radicalisation
  • liaise with partners, including the local authority and the policeIt is the role of staff to understand the issues of radicalisation, are able to recognise the signs of vulnerability or radicalisation and know how to refer their concerns.We are committed to ensuring that our children are offered a broad and balanced curriculum that aims to prepare them for life in modern Britain. We encourage our children to be inquisitive learners who are open to new experiences and are tolerant of others.Internet SafetyWe do not allow the children to access social medial, such as Facebook. Searches and web addresses are monitored by the staff.
    Where staff find unblocked extremist contents they must report it to the Manager.Staff will be given training to help them understand the issues of radicalisation, are able to recognise the signs of vulnerability or radicalisation and know how to refer their concerns. Staff are updated as necessary in staff meetings.
    Safe SpaceSafer RecruitmentSigns of VulnerabilitySigns of vulnerability include:
  • There are no known definitive indications that a young person is vulnerable to radicalisation, but there are number of signs that together increase the risk.
  • We ensure that the staff we appoint to the Pre-School are suitable, our recruitment procedures are rigorous. Vetting and barring checks are undertaken.
  • We make sure that Little Roo’s is a safe space for children to ask questions and tackle difficult or sensitive issues. We will ensure our staff are confident about facilitating these discussions.
  • Staff Training
  • The internet provides children and young people with access to a wide range of content, some of which is harmful. Extremists use the internet, including social media, to share the message. The parental controls used in the Pre-School blocks inappropriate contact and extremist content. When such resources are available.
  • The curriculum aims to develop resilience in children in young people so that they feel able to ask questions
  • Curriculum
  • Role of staff
  • underachievement
  • being in possession of extremist literature
  • poverty
  • social exclusion
  • traumatic events
  • global or national events
  • religious conversion
  • change in behaviour
  • extremist influences
  • conflict with family over lifestyle
  • confused identify
  • victim or witness to race or hate crimes
  • rejection by peers, family, social groups or faithEarly indicators of radicalisation or extremism may include:
  • Recognising Extremism
  • showing sympathy for extremist causes
  • glorifying violence, especially to other faiths or cultures
  • making remarks or comments about being at extremist events or rallies outside Pre-School.
  • evidence of possessing illegal or extremist literature
  • advocating messages similar to illegal organisation or other extremist groups
  • out of character changes in dress, behaviour and peer relationships (but there are also very powerful narratives, programmes and networks that young people can come across online so involvement with particular groups may not be apparent.)
  • secretive behaviour
  • online searches or sharing extremist messages or social profiles
  • intolerance of difference, including faith, culture, gender, race or sexuality
  • graffiti, art work or writing that displays extremist themes
  • attempts to impose extremist views or practices on others
  • verbalising anti-Western or anti-British views
  • advocating violence towards othersStaff must refer all concerns about children and young people who show signs of vulnerability or of radicalisation must be passed to the Designated Safeguarding officer using the usual methods for reporting other safeguarding concerns.The role of the key person and settling-in PolicyWe believe that children settle best when they have a key person to relate to, who knows them and their parents well, and who can meet their individual needs. Research shows that a key person approach benefits the child, the parents, the staff and the setting by providing secure relationships in which children thrive, parents have confidence [our staff are committed and the setting is a happy and dedicated place to attend or work in.The key person role is set out in the Safeguarding and Welfare Requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. Each child must have a key person. These procedures set out a model for developing a key person approach that promotes effective and positive relationships for children.We allocate a key person before the child starts.
  • The key person is responsible for:
  • Procedures
  • We want children to feel safe, stimulated and happy in the setting and to feel secure and comfortable with our staff. We also want parents to have confidence in both their children’s well-being and their role as active partners with our setting. We aim to make our setting a welcoming place where children settle quickly and easily because consideration has been given to the individual needs and circumstances of children and their families.
  • Policy statement
  • When there are significant concerns about a child, the Designated Safeguarding officer in liaison with the Manager will make a referral to the appropriate body.
  • Referral Process
  • Providing an induction for the family and for settling the child into our setting.
  • Completing relevant forms with parents, including consent forms along with the Room Lead.
  • Explaining our policies and procedures to parents with particular focus on policies such as safeguarding and our responsibilities under the Prevent Duty.
  • Offering unconditional regard for the child and being non-judgmental.
  • Working with the parents to plan and deliver a personalised plan for the child’s well-being, care and learning.
  • Acting as the key contact for the parents.
  • Developmental records and for sharing information on a regular basis with the child’s parents to keep those records up-to-date, reflecting the full picture of the child in our setting and at home.
  • Having links with other carers involved with the child and co-ordinating the sharing of appropriate information about the child’s development with those carers.
  • Encouraging positive relationships between children in her/his key group, spending time with them as a group each day.
  • We promote the role of the key person as the child’s primary carer in our setting, and as the basis for establishing relationships with other adults and children.
  • We have a key person promise.
  • We make sure that all home contact books have key person promise, role of the key person and the key person postcard information card.Before a child starts to attend our setting, we use a variety of ways to provide his/her parents with information. These include written information (including our prospectus and policies), displays about activities available within the setting, information days and evenings and individual meetings with parents.The key person welcomes and looks after the child and his/her parents at the child’s first session and during the settling-in process.We use pre-start visits and the first session at which a child attends to explain and complete, with his/her parents, the child’s registration records.We have an expectation that the parent, carer or close relative, will stay for most of the session during the first week, gradually taking time away from their child; increasing this time as and when the child is able to cope.We judge a child to be settled when they have formed a relationship with their key person; for example, the child looks for the key person when he/she arrives, goes to them for comfort, and seems pleased to be with them. The child is also familiar with where things are and is pleased to see other children and participate in activities.We recognise that some children will settle more readily than others, but that some children who appear to settle rapidly are not ready to be left. We expect that the parent will honour the commitment to stay for at least the first week, or possibly longer, until their child can stay happily without them.We reserve the right not to accept a child into the setting without a parent or carer if the child finds it distressing to be left. This is especially the case with very young children.The progress check at age twoThe progress check aims to review the child’s development and ensures that parents have a clear picture of their child’s development.The progress check will describe the actions that will be taken by us to address any developmental concerns (including working with other professionals where appropriate) as agreed with the parent(s).Safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adultsLittle Roo’s will work with children, parents and the community to ensure the rights and safety of children, young people* and vulnerable adults. Our Safeguarding Policy is based on the three key commitments of the Pre-school Learning Alliance Safeguarding Children Policy.We carry out the following procedures to ensure we meet the three key commitments of the Alliance Safeguarding Children Policy, which incorporates responding to child protection concerns.We are committed to building a ‘culture of safety’ in which children, young people and vulnerable adults are protected from abuse and harm in all areas of our service delivery.When the setting is open but the designated person is not on site, a suitably trained deputy is available at all times for staff to discuss safeguarding concerns.The designated person, the suitably trained deputy and the designated officer ensure they have relevant links with statutory and voluntary organisations with regard to safeguarding.We ensure all staff are trained to understand our safeguarding policies and procedures and that parents are made aware of them too.All staff are confident to ask questions in relation to any safeguarding concerns and know not to just take things at face value but can be respectfully skeptical.
    All staff understand the principles of early help (as defined in Working Together to Safeguard Children, 2015) and are able to identify those children and families who may be in need of early help and enable them to access it.All staff understand how to escalate their concerns in the event that they feel either the local authority and/or their own organisation has not acted adequately to safeguard.Children have a key person to build a relationship with, and are supported to articulate any worries, concerns or complaints that they may have in an age appropriate way.Applicants for posts within the setting are clearly informed that the positions are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974.Where applications are rejected based on information disclosed, applicants have the right to know and to challenge incorrect information.Volunteers must:
  • Enhanced criminal records and barred lists checks are carried out on anyone living or working on the premises.
  • Enhanced criminal records and barred lists checks and other suitability checks are carried out for staff and volunteers prior to their post being confirmed, to ensure that no disqualified person or unsuitable person works at the setting or has access to the children.
  • All staff understand our policy on promoting positive behaviour and follow it in relation to children showing aggression towards other children.
    Adequate and appropriate staffing resources are provided to meet the needs of children.
  • All staff understand what the organisation expects of them in terms of their required behaviour and conduct, and follow our policies and procedures on positive behaviour, online safety (including use of mobile phones), whistleblowing and dignity at work.
  • All staff understand LSCB thresholds of significant harm and understand how to access services for families, including for those families who are below the threshold for significant harm.
  • All staff have an up-to-date knowledge of safeguarding issues, are alert to potential indicators and signs of abuse and neglect and understand their professional duty to ensure safeguarding and child protection concerns are reported to the local authority children’s social care team or the NSPCC. They receive updates on safeguarding at least annually.
  • The designated person (and the person who deputies for them) understands LSCB safeguarding procedures, attends relevant LSCB training at least every two years and refreshes their knowledge of safeguarding at least annually.
  • Our designated officer (a member of the management team) who oversees this work is: Joanne Julier
  • Our designated person (a member of staff) who co-ordinates child, young person and vulnerable adult protection issues is: Zoe Farren
  • Key commitment 1
  • Procedures
  • Policy statement
  • The key person will plan activities to meet the child’s needs within the setting and will support parents to understand the child’s needs in order to enhance their development at home.
  • Within the progress check, the key person will note areas where the child is progressing well and identify areas where progress is less than expected.
  • The key person carries out the progress check at age two in accordance with any local procedures that are in place and referring to the guidance A Know How Guide: The EYFS progress check at age two.
  • Within the first four to six weeks of starting, we discuss and work with the child’s parents to begin to create their child’s record of achievement.
  • We do not believe that leaving a child to cry will help them to settle any quicker. We believe that a child’s distress will prevent them from learning and gaining the best from the setting.
  • When parents leave, we ask them to say goodbye to their child and explain that they will be coming back, and when.
  • Younger children will take longer to settle in, as will children who have not previously spent time away from home. Children who have had a period of absence may also need their parent to be on hand to re- settle them.
  • When a child starts to attend, we explain the process of settling-in with his/her parents and jointly decide on the best way to help the child to settle into the setting.
  • We may offer a home visit by the person who will be the child’s key person to ensure all relevant information about the child can be made known.
  • During the half-term before a child is enrolled, we provide opportunities for the child and his/her parents to visit the setting.
  • Settling-in
  • be aged 17 or over;
  • be considered competent and responsible;
    receive a robust induction and regular supervisory meetings;
  • be familiar with all the settings policies and procedures;
  • be fully checked for suitability if they are to have unsupervised access to the children at any time.
  • Information is recorded about staff qualifications, and the identity checks and vetting processes that have been completed including:
  • the criminal records disclosure reference number;
    certificate of good conduct or equivalent where a UK DBS check is not appropriate;
  • the date the disclosure was obtained; and
  • details of who obtained it.All staff and volunteers are required to notify us if anyone in their household (including family members, lodgers, partners etc.) has any relevant convictions, cautions, court orders, reprimands or warnings or has been barred from, or had registration refused or cancelled in relation to any childcare provision or have had orders made in relation to care of their children.Procedures are in place to record the details of visitors to the setting.Steps are taken to ensure children are not photographed or filmed on video for any other purpose than to record their development or their participation in events organised by us. Parents sign a consent form and have access to records holding visual images of their child.The designated person in the setting has responsibility for ensuring that there is an adequate online safety policy in place.We ensure that robust risk assessments are completed, that they are seen and signed by all relevant staff and that they are regularly reviewed and updated, in line with our health and safety policy.The designated person will inform the designated officer at the first opportunity of every significant safeguarding concern, however this should not delay any referrals being made to children’s social care, the LADO, Ofsted or Riddor.We are committed to responding promptly and appropriately to all incidents, allegations or concerns of abuse that may occur and to work with statutory agencies in accordance with the procedures that are set down in ‘What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused’ (HMG, 2015) and the Care Act 2014.We acknowledge that abuse of children can take different forms – physical, emotional, and sexual, as well as neglect.When children are suffering from physical, sexual or emotional abuse, or experiencing neglect, this may be demonstrated through:
  • We ensure that all staff have an understanding of the additional vulnerabilities that arise from special educational needs and/or disabilities, plus inequalities of race, gender, language, religion, sexual orientation or culture, and that these receive full consideration in relation to child, young person or vulnerable adult protection.
  • Responding to suspicions of abuse
  • Key commitment 2
  • The designated officer will support the designated person to undertake their role adequately and offer advice, guidance, supervision and support.
  • We keep a written record of all complaints and concerns including details of how they were responded to.
  • Any personal information is held securely and in line with data protection requirements and guidance from the ICO.
  • Security steps are taken to ensure that we have control over who comes into the setting so that no unauthorised person has unsupervised access to the children.
  • We notify the Disclosure and Barring Service of any person who is dismissed from our employment or resigns in circumstances that would otherwise have led to dismissal for reasons of a child protection concern.
  • All staff and volunteers are informed that they are expected to disclose any convictions, cautions, court orders or reprimands and warnings which may affect their suitability to work with children (whether received before or during their employment with us).
  • significant changes in their behaviour;
  • deterioration in their general well-being;
  • their comments which may give cause for concern, or the things they say (direct or indirect disclosure);
  • changes in their appearance, their behaviour, or their play;
  • unexplained bruising, marks or signs of possible abuse or neglect; and
  • any reason to suspect neglect or abuse outside the setting.We are aware that children’s vulnerability is potentially increased when they are privately fostered and when we know that a child is being cared for under a private fostering arrangement, we inform our local authority children’s social care team.In relation to radicalisation and extremism, we follow the Prevent Duty guidance for England and Wales published by the Home Office and LSCB procedures on responding to radicalisation.We are aware of the mandatory duty that applies to teachers and health workers to report cases of Female Genital Mutilation to the police.Where we believe that a child in our care or that is known to us may be affected by any of these factors we follow the procedures below for reporting child protection concerns and follow the LSCB procedures.In the event that a staff member or volunteer is unhappy with the decision made of the designated person in relation to whether to make a safeguarding referral they must follow escalation procedures.We take care not to influence the outcome either through the way we speak to children or by asking questions of children.All staff are also aware that adults can also be vulnerable and know how to refer adults who are in need of community care services.Staff/volunteers know they can contact the organisation Public Concern at Work for advice relating to whistleblowing; if they feel that the organisation has not acted adequately in relation to safeguarding they can contact the NSPCC whistleblowing helpline.Where a child makes comments to a member of staff that give cause for concern (disclosure), or a member of staff observes signs or signals that give cause for concern, such as significant changes in behaviour; deterioration in general well-being; unexplained bruising, marks or signs of possible abuse or neglect; that member of staff:
  • Recording suspicions of abuse and disclosures
  • We have a whistleblowing policy in place.
  • We take account of the need to protect young people aged 16-19 as defined by the Children Act 1989. This may include students or school children on work placement, young employees or young parents. Where abuse is suspected we follow the procedure for reporting any other child protection concerns. The views of the young person will always be taken into account, but the setting may override the young person’s refusal to consent to share information if it feels that it is necessary to prevent a crime from being committed or intervene where one may have been, or to prevent harm to a child or adult. Sharing confidential information without consent is done only where not sharing it could be worse than the outcome of having shared it.
  • We refer concerns to the local authority children’s social care team and co-operate fully in any subsequent investigation. NB In some cases this may mean the police or another agency identified by the Local Safeguarding Children Board.
  • Where such evidence is apparent, the child’s key person makes a dated record of the details of the concern and discusses what to do with the member of staff who is acting as the designated person. The information is stored on the child’s personal file.
  • We also make ourselves aware that some children and young people are affected by gang activity, by complex, multiple or organised abuse, through forced marriage or honour based violence or may be victims of child trafficking. While this may be less likely to affect young children in our care, we may become aware of any of these factors affecting older children and young people who we may come into contact with.
  • The designated person completes online Channel training, online Prevent training and attends local WRAP training where available to ensure they are familiar with the local protocol and procedures for responding to concerns about radicalisation.
  • We are aware of other factors that affect children’s vulnerability that may affect, or may have affected, children and young people using our provision, such as abuse of children who have special educational needs and/or disabilities; fabricated or induced illness; child abuse linked to beliefs in spirit possession; sexual exploitation of children, including through internet abuse; Female Genital Mutilation and radicalisation or extremism.
  • We are aware of the ‘hidden harm’ agenda concerning parents with drug and alcohol problems and consider other factors affecting parental capacity and risk, such as social exclusion, domestic violence, radicalisation, mental or physical illness and parent’s learning disability.
  • listens to the child, offers reassurance and gives assurance that she or he will take action;
  • does not question the child, although it is OK to ask questions for the purposes of clarification;
  • makes a written record that forms an objective record of the
  • observation or disclosure that includes: the date and time of the observation or the disclosure; the exact words spoken by the child as far as possible; the name of the person to whom the concern was reported, with the date and time; and the names of any other person present at the time.The member of staff acting as the designated person is informed of the issue at the earliest opportunity, and within one working day.Making a referral to the local authority children’s social care teamMulti- agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH), Civic offices, New Road, Grays, Rm17 6slthurrockmash@thurrock.gov.uk
  • For use outside of normal office working
  • 01375 652 802
  • Children’s Services Initial Response.
  • Where the Local Safeguarding Children Board stipulates the process for recording and sharing concerns, we include those procedures alongside this procedure and follow the steps set down by the Local Safeguarding Children Board.
  • These records are signed and dated and kept in the child’s personal file, which is kept securely and confidentially.
  • Monday to Thursday 16.30 to 09.00am
  • Friday from 16.30 through weekend until 09.00am Monday
  • Public holidays
  • Police Child Abuse Investigation TeamOr
  • Call 999 if you are concerned a child needs immediate protection.
  • Call 101

Escalation process

If we feel that a referral made has not been dealt with properly or that concerns are not being addressed or responded to, we will follow the LSCB escalation process.

We will ensure that staff are aware of how to escalate concerns.

Informing parents

Parents are normally the first point of contact. Concerns are discussed with parents to gain their view of events, unless it is felt that this may put the child at risk, or interfere with the course of a police investigation. Advice will be sought from social care if necessary.

Parents are informed when we make a record of concerns in their child’s file and that we also make a note of any discussion we have with them regarding a concern.

If a suspicion of abuse warrants referral to social care, parents are informed at the same time that the referral will be made, except where the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board does not allow this, for example, where it is believed that the child may be placed at risk.

This will usually be the case where the parent is the likely abuser.

If there is a possibility that advising a parent beforehand may place a child at greater risk (or interfere with a police response) the designated person should seek advice from children’s social care, about whether or not to advise parents beforehand, and should record and follow the advice given.

Liaison with other agencies

We work within the Local Safeguarding Children Board guidelines.

The current version of ‘What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused’ is available for parents and staff and all staff are familiar with what they need to do if they have concerns.

We have procedures for contacting the local authority regarding child protection issues, including maintaining a list of names, addresses and telephone numbers of social workers, to ensure that it is easy, in any emergency, for the setting and children’s social care to work well together.

We notify Ofsted of any incident or accident and any changes in our arrangements which may affect the well-being of children or where an allegation of abuse is made against a member of staff (whether the allegations relate to harm or abuse committed on our premises or elsewhere).

Notifications to Ofsted are made as soon as is reasonably practicable, but at the latest within 14 days of the allegations being made.

Contact details for the local National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) are also kept.

Allegations against staff

We ensure that all parents know how to complain about the behaviour or actions of staff or volunteers within the setting, or anyone living or working on the premises occupied by the setting, which may include an allegation of abuse.

We respond to any inappropriate behaviour displayed by members of staff, volunteer or any other person living or working on the premises, which includes:

  • inappropriate sexual comments;
  • excessive one-to-one attention beyond the requirements of their usual role and responsibilities, or inappropriate sharing of images.We ensure that all staff and volunteers know how to raise concerns about a member of staff or volunteer within the setting. We respond to any concerns raised by staff and volunteers who know how to escalate their concerns if they are not satisfied with our responseWe refer any such complaint immediately to the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) to investigate and/or offer advice:In absence of Sharon Owen please contact Marie Jerman (01375652733), LADO administrative officer who will redirect you to a Child Protection Chairperson for advice. We co-operate entirely with any investigation carried out by children’s social care in conjunction with the police.Disciplinary ActionKey Commitment 3TrainingDesignated Safeguarding Leads receive appropriate training, as recommended by the Local Safeguarding Children Board, every two years and refresh their knowledge and skills at least annually.We ensure that all staff receive updates on safeguarding via emails, newsletters, online training and/or discussion at staff meetings at least once a year.The layout of the rooms allows for constant supervision. No child is left alone with staff or volunteers in a one-to-one situation without being within sight and/or hearing of other staff or volunteers.We introduce key elements of keeping children safe into our programme to promote the personal, social and emotional development of all children, so that they may grow to be strong, resilient and listened to and so that they develop an understanding of why and how to keep safe.We ensure that this is carried out in a way that is developmentally appropriate for the children.All suspicions and investigations are kept confidential and shared only with those who need to know. Any information is shared under the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board.We believe in building trusting and supportive relationships with families, staff and volunteers.We will continue to welcome the child and the family whilst investigations are being made in relation to any alleged abuse.Confidential records kept on a child are shared with the child’s parents or those who have parental responsibility for the child in accordance with the Confidentiality and Client Access to Records procedure, and only if appropriate under the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board.Primary legislation
    Children Act (1989 s47)
    Protection of Children Act (1999)
    The Children Act (2004 s11)
    Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act (2006)
    Childcare Act (2006)Further guidanceWhat to do if you’re Worried a Child is Being Abused (HMG, 2015)The Common Assessment Framework for Children and Young People: A Guide for Practitioners (CWDC 2010)Hidden Harm – Responding to the Needs of Children of Problem Drug Users (ACMD, 2003)Disclosure and Barring Service: www.gov.uk/disclosure-barring-service-check
    Revised Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales (HMG, 2015)
  • Inspecting Safeguarding in Early Years, Education and Skills Settings, (Ofsted, 2016)
  • Information Sharing: Guidance for Practitioners providing Safeguarding Services (DfE 2015)
  • Statutory guidance on making arrangements to safeguard and promote the welfare of children under section 11 of the Children Act 2004 (HMG 2008)
  • Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families (DoH 2000)
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children (HMG, 2015)
  • Secondary legislation
    Sexual Offences Act (2003)
    Criminal Justice and Court Services Act (2000)
    Equality Act (2010)
    Data Protection Act (1998)
    Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations (2009)
    Children and Families Act (2014)
    Care Act (2014)
    Serious Crime Act (2015)
    Counter-Terrorism and Security Act (2015)
  • Legal framework
  • We follow the Child Protection Plan as set by the child’s social worker in relation to the setting’s designated role and tasks in supporting that child and their family, subsequent to any investigation.
  • We make clear to parents our role and responsibilities in relation to child protection, such as for the reporting of concerns, information sharing, monitoring of the child, and liaising at all times with the local children’s social care team.
  • Support to families
  • Confidentiality
  • We create within the setting a culture of value and respect for individuals, having positive regard for children’s heritage arising from their colour, ethnicity, languages spoken at home, cultural and social background.
  • Curriculum
  • Planning
  • We ensure that all staff know the procedures for reporting and recording any concerns they may have about the provision.
  • Training opportunities are sought for all adults involved in the setting to ensure that they are able to recognise the signs and signals of possible physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse (including child sexual exploitation) and neglect and that they are aware of the local authority guidelines for making referrals.
  • We are committed to promoting awareness of child abuse issues throughout our training and learning programmes for adults. We are also committed to empowering children through our early childhood curriculum, promoting their right to be strong, resilient and listened to.
  • Where a member of staff or volunteer has been dismissed due to engaging in activities that caused concern for the safeguarding of children or vulnerable adults, we will notify the Disclosure and Barring Service of relevant information, so that individuals who pose a threat to children and vulnerable groups can be identified and barred from working with these groups.
  • Where the management team and children’s social care agree it is appropriate in the circumstances, the member of staff or volunteer will be suspended for the duration of the investigation. This is not an indication of admission that the alleged incident has taken place, but is to protect the staff, as well as children and families, throughout the process.
  • We also report any such alleged incident to Ofsted (unless advised by LADO that this is unnecessary due to the incident not meeting the threshold), as well as what measures we have taken. We are aware that it is an offence not to do this.
  •  (Sharon Owen 01375 652921)
  • We respond to any disclosure by children or staff that abuse by a member of staff or volunteer within the setting, or anyone living or working on the premises occupied by the setting, may have taken, or is taking place, by first recording the details of any such alleged incident.
  • We follow the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board when responding to any complaint that a member of staff or volunteer within the setting, or anyone living or working on the premises occupied by the setting, has abused a child.

Children need to learn to consider the views and feelings, needs and rights, of others and the impact that their behaviour has on people, places and objects.

This is a developmental task that requires support, encouragement, teaching and setting the correct example. The principles that underpin how we achieve positive and considerate behaviour exist within the programme for promoting personal, social and emotional development.